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GI Health

A healthy gastrointestinal tract is a critical part of your pet’s overall health and happiness. The most common function of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is digestion of food and the subsequent absorption of nutrients. The GI tract also plays a large role as part of the immune system. The intestines contain thousands of different types of bacteria, referred to as microflora, and many of these bacteria provide support for intestinal health and protect against harmful bacteria. Beneficial bacterial are therefore necessary to maintain the overall well-being of the intestines, and proper digestion is critical to ensure nutrients can be processed and used properly to keep your pet healthy.

A high quality diet is a key component to keeping your pet’s GI tract healthy, but choosing a “good” diet for your pet can be a very challenging task. As a pet parent you can be overwhelmed with advertisements, commercials, hundreds of different brands, flavors, ingredients and kibble sizes. There are also many fads and misinformation about which diets would be considered better for your pet. For example, we often hear negative information about corn in diets, fillers, and food allergies that have promoted a grain free trend in the pet food industry. Unfortunately most of what you hear is seldom correct and studies now show some of these diets are linked to serious health issues.

So before you choose what you think is a “good” diet, please consult with one of our clinics to help you make the “best” decision for your pet. Our veterinary team can help you choose a diet for your pet based on activity level, lifestyle, and other factors that will keep them happy and healthy.

Digestive disorders may occur for many reasons. Regardless of cause, these disorders often result in reduced digestion and absorption of nutrients, dehydration and malnutrition. GI disturbances are rather common and may resolve on their own within a day or two, however some pets may have continued or worsening symtpoms. Symptoms may include loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, lethargy, weight loss or inadequate weight gain. These symptoms may worsen or wax and wane depending on the underlying cause. Some causes may include predominantly GI associated issues such as eating inappropriate foods, sudden changes in pet diets, food allergies or dietary intolerances, infections, intestinal parasites, foreign bodies, and toxins. Occasionally GI symptoms may occur secondary to stress or other organ related issues such as pancreatitis.

Given the numerous possible causes of the GI tract symptoms, we always recommend contacting one of our veterinary clinics if any of these symptoms occur. Any pet whose symptoms have occurred for more than 24 hours should be examined by one of our veterinarians as soon as possible for diagnotics and appropriate care. Diagnostics may include fecal testing, blood work and xrays. Treatment options depend on the underlying cause but may often include the use of prescription diets, anti-nausea medications, antibiotics and probiotics and deworming medications.

Masking

As you’ve seen in other posts, this is my art side coming out. Veterinary Dentistry is the arts and crafts of veterinary medicine.

This post is part of a series started many months ago in regards to card creations we are using in the office (and showcasing my creative outlet).

In the last class, “Masking Unleashed,” many types of masking were reviewed.

The stamp set Cherished Memories was stamped onto watercolor paper and masked (positive masking with fussy cut outs) with Staz On ink, yet Altenew’s permanent black ink would work well if I had had a larger ink pad. The image was watercolored and the watercolor spatters were added to the background. The layered leaves cover die was cut to add embellishment to this simple card.

If you are the recipient of this card from my office, I hope it brightens your day!

Dr. Jen

Alcohol Markers

As you’ve seen in other posts, this is my art side coming out. Veterinary Dentistry is the arts and crafts of veterinary medicine.

This post is part of a series started many months ago in regards to card creations we are using in the office (and showcasing my creative outlet).

In the class, “Magical Marker Techniques,” Altenew’s Artist Markers and Copic/alcohol markers were used.

Many of these techniques appear like freehand so they are not my style. I decided to use a stencil to layer the markers. Instead of cutting my own with a negative die cut, I used Altenew’s rose stencil and Altenew’s artist markers.

A colorless blender was used to finish the card and smooth the layers. Altenew’s markers have great tips but they do not blend as well as traditional copic markers, yet they are still great for coloring images.

The image was finished with shimmer spray and the text from the cherished memories stamp set.

Blended marker coloring as shown in this image is more of my style to do with alcohol markers:

If you are the recipient of this card from my office, I hope it brightens your day!

Dr. Jen

Embossing

As you’ve seen in other posts, this is my art side coming out. Veterinary Dentistry is the arts and crafts of veterinary medicine.

This post is part of a series started many months ago in regards to card creations we are using in the office (and showcasing my creative outlet).

In the class, “Impressive Heat Embossing,” many embossing techniques were reviewed. As I had never layered embossing, I decided to use this lesson. I would not use this technique with solid stamps in the future as the layers of embossing powder can mix and run.

The finished card works, but I would replace the layered embossed image with something else in the future. The die cut you was layered with rose gold embossing powder to bring the card elements together. The back ground is a 3D dry embossing folder.

If you are the recipient of this card from my office, I hope it brightens your day!

Dr. Jen

Color Inspiration

As you’ve seen in other posts, this is my art side coming out. Veterinary Dentistry is the arts and crafts of veterinary medicine.

This post is part of a series started many months ago in regards to card creations we are using in the office (and showcasing my creative outlet).

In Altenew’s class, “Color Your Day,” we were taught to:
      Be inspired by a photo
      Use a color wheel 
      Decide how much color

I put it all together.
This is the image from my phone for my inspiration – I was lucky enough to snap this image at 7am on a wildlife walk at O’Reilly’s retreat in Lamington National Park in Australia last month while my husband traveled there for a conference. These are Australian Eastern Yellow Robins:

The winter cardinal set was used to create this card. The colors were selected to try to imitate the photo and the resulting layers.

Dry embossing folder and silver splatters were used to add interest to the background. The sentiment (masked) and branch were distressed to mimic the tree bark.

If you are the recipient of this card from my office, I hope it brightens your day!

Dr. Jen

It’s All About Detail

As you’ve seen in other posts, this is my art side coming out. Veterinary Dentistry is the arts and crafts of veterinary medicine.

This post is part of a series started many months ago in regards to card creations we are using in the office (and showcasing my creative outlet).

In the class, “Beautiful Details,” additional colored details were added to each card. The time and artistry of each card was impressive. I prefer not to spend this much time coloring so this is certainly not my thing but watching the videos was also inspiring.

I decided to attempt to create a card similar to the soft daisy on vellum for a wedding. The bride’s colors are navy and white with the added touch of natural greens. The bouquet was stamped in Versamark and embossed with clear powder onto vellum card stock.

For the reverse side I laid down base color with Altenew’s artist markers, then began to add colored pencils.

Using a stylus over a thin sponge, I drew onto the vellum card stock to dry emboss making the sprigs in the bouquet stark white.

My colored pencil work resulted in grey roses not white.

While they are fine, they did not look good on my finished card, so I moved the colored vellum panel to some patterned paper to create a separate card. I replaced the bouquet with a simple silver embossed one.

The organza ribbon was stamped with Staz On to add the sentiment.

Here are my finished cards in my preferred layout.

If you are the recipient of one of these cards from my office, I hope it brightens your day!

Dr. Jen

Adding Multiple Colors with Faux Watercoloring

As you’ve seen in other posts, this is my art side coming out. Veterinary Dentistry is the arts and crafts of veterinary medicine.

This post is part of a series started many months ago in regards to card creations we are using in the office (and showcasing my creative outlet).

In Altenew’s class, “Polychromatic,” different ways to add color were reviewed. My favorite project in the class was the monochromatic one, but I chose to utilize the faux hand watercolored effect technique in my project.

I know this faux hand watercolored effect as ‘rock and roll.’ Use a solid stamp, inked fully with a lighter colored ink, then using a rock and roll motion add bits of color to the edges of the stamp with the darker color. Spritz with water and stamp.

The word thanks was die cut and layered to raise the text.

Gold sequins were added.

If you are the recipient of one of these cards from my office, I hope it brightens your day!

Dr. Jen

Emboss Resist

As you’ve seen in other posts, this is my art side coming out. Veterinary Dentistry is the arts and crafts of veterinary medicine.

This post is part of a series started many months ago in regards to card creations we are using in the office (and showcasing my creative outlet).

In the Altenew’s class, “Creative Watercolor Media,” watercolors are used in different ways.

The emboss resist technique was used with one of Altenew’s hydrangea layers. Anti static powder was added then multiple stamps with versamark and a stamp positioner gives the best inked image. Clear embossing powder was heated before dye ink was dropped over moist watercolor paper. The page was trimmed and two cards were created.

Silver splatters and silver thread add interest:

If you are the recipient of one of these cards from my office, I hope it brightens your day!

Dr. Jen

Cut It Oddly

As you’ve seen in other posts, this is my art side coming out. Veterinary Dentistry is the arts and crafts of veterinary medicine.

This post is part of a series started many months ago in regards to card creations we are using in the office (and showcasing my creative outlet).

In the class, “With a Twist,” we are told try different things with the materials we already have. I chose to “cut it oddly” like one of the lessons. This was one of my favorite Altenew classes.

I decided to use the reinker supplies I already have in a different way and cut it oddly as in the lesson.
First, a quarter sheet of photo paper or glossy card stock was set out. A large cotton ball was soaked in rubbing alcohol and drops of reinker were placed on the cotton ball.

Gold metallic reinker was also used. One card used two drops of blue reinker and 4 drops of gold, while the other used 4 drops of blue and 2 drops of gold. The cotton ball is pounced onto the cardstock giving the marble look, then allowed to dry.

Accents of gold mirror cardstock was added to complete the oddly cut card.

If you are the recipient of one of these cards from my office, I hope it brightens your day!

Dr. Jen

Color Can Create Mood

As you’ve seen in other posts, this is my art side coming out. Veterinary Dentistry is the arts and crafts of veterinary medicine.

This post is part of a series started many months ago in regards to card creations we are using in the office (and showcasing my creative outlet).

The 12th class, In the Mood for Color, shows mainly monochromatic cards – cards in which one color is the focus and the image/color matches the mood of the color.

Faux dry embossing by layering white on white dies was done, then the pink focus of the mood of hope was added.

The peony dream dies were utilized as well as flower soft yellow embellishment.

If you are the recipient of this card from my office, I hope it brightens your day!

Dr. Jen